Cardiovascular Disease and Nutrition

Yay! Spring is finally here! Mother nature is slowly waking up from her long winter sleep and everything around blossoms into beauty. Spring is a particularly euphoric period as it brings a burst of colors, light and warmth after a seemingly endless winter. It’s the perfect time to start anew; improve our lifestyle and dietary … Continue reading Spring: 3 foods you should be eating now!

Today 1.1 billion people are affected by hypertension (high blood pressure) globally.  The World Health Organization (WHO) reports that an average of 59.3 million new cases of hypertension are identified each year.  Hypertension is responsible for almost half of deaths caused by heart attack or stroke.  Diet plays a crucial role in the treatment and … Continue reading Nutritional Advice to Fight Against High Blood Pressure

Are you short of ideas for festive meals? Try some recipes that replace unhealthy fats with good ones such as omega-3 fatty acids. These unsaturated fatty acids are essential for proper functioning of our bodies. They act as energy reserves and intervene in the production of certain nutrients by the body. Omega-3 fatty acids can … Continue reading Holiday Season Cooking with Omega-3 Fatty Acids

Counting calories is an important part of making smarter nutritional choices. Dieticians, nutritionists, and fitness experts alike now recommend looking beyond the quantity of calories, and measuring the macronutrients of the food you eat in order to achieve weight loss goals. This is now being called macro dieting. Macro dieting aims to feed the body … Continue reading The Importance of Macronutrients in Weight Loss

portion size control

There are different myths and misunderstood facts that circulate about weight-loss, health, fitness and food choice. Some of these are simply urban legends, while others may have been true at some point.  Today, there is overwhelming scientific evidence that weight-loss has a direct connection to the quality and quantity of the food that we eat.  … Continue reading Does Portion Size Really Matter for Healthy Eating?

childhood-obesity

If in ancient times, being fat was a symbol of wealth and abundance, nowadays, it is a common fact that overweight and obesity may increase the risk of many health problems. Moreover, the subject of childhood obesity is becoming an ever-greater social concern at present. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), childhood obesity is … Continue reading Childhood obesity: an ever-greater social concern

In the modern society, people keeps pushing the emphasis on being thin. In fact, for many people, being thin is vital to be considered beautiful. Obese or overweight people are socially ostracised. For many of them, the only way out of that vicious circle is to lose weight drastically. Dieting can be long and full … Continue reading Crash diets – why starving yourself is bad for weight loss?

Obesity has reached the point of a global epidemic, according to a new report published by the World Health Organization (WHO).  A person is considered obese when their body mass index exceeds 30.  Today, obesity affects more than 2.8 million people each year and this number is increasing constantly.  Excess weight kills approximately 3.4 billion … Continue reading Global Obesity Epidemic – Time to Act Decisively

It is no easy task to navigate the endless directions and advice from thousands of food experts.  Nor is it easy to stick to an daily nutrition recommendation.  Did I eat the recommended 15% of the daily intake of proteins? What about 50% of carbohydrates? At DietSensor, eating healthy is what we do. The new … Continue reading DietSensor’s New Premium Plan Offers Smart Food Suggestions

3 September 2016What is Fiber?

Fiber can contribute to good health in many ways. In addition to helping move food efficiently through your body, it can also help prevent heart disease, diabetes, digestive problems and weight gain.

New research provides further evidence of the health benefits of fruit consumption, after finding that eating fresh fruits daily may lower the risks of heart attack, stroke and cardiovascular death. According to the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, it is recommended that adults who get less than 30 minutes of moderate exercise daily consume 1.5-2 cups of fruits each day.

The American Heart Association gives several advices to get a better lifestyle and to reduce cardiovascular diseases. According to the association, a better way of living based on regular activities and controlling daily intake will be beneficial for the health and the heart in the long term. Regular physical activities can help you maintain your weight, keep off weight that you lose and help you reach physical and cardiovascular fitness. Moreover, a healthy consumption of different nutritious food will bring various nutrients which your body needs each day.

The 2015 guidelines recommend a "healthy eating pattern" with limited sugar and saturated fat, less salt and more vegetables and whole grains. The guidelines are revised every five years, and the draft version of this year's guide came in months ago at more than 500 pages. The guidance affects everything from what's served in school and prison lunches to how food labels work. It helps dietitians guide their clients. Experts say it also puts pressure on manufacturers and restaurants about what they put in their food. At the end, "Diet is essential to health ... we are really left with no solid advice for most people," but DietSensor can fulfill those gaps left without answers.

There is some welcome news for chocolate lovers; new research suggests eating chocolate every day may lower the likelihood of diabetes and heart disease

While controlling blood pressure, blood sugar and LDL-cholesterol levels reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease in people with diabetes, only 7 percent of diabetic participants in three major heart studies had recommended levels of these three factors, according to research from the Heart Disease Prevention Program at the University of California, Irvine School of Medicine.

Actually, when consumed in moderation, butter is actually pretty good for you. Research found butter fights cancer, reduces diabetes symptoms, is packed with vitamins that boost your immune system and keeps bones strong and teeth healthy. So, before you dump all your vegetable oil down the drain, let’s take a look at the research.

Eating fresh pears may improve blood pressure and vascular function in middle-aged men and women who are at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases and type 2 diabetes, according to a new study. "These initial results are very promising," said lead author Sarah A Johnson, who conducted the research while at Florida State University. "With metabolic syndrome being of such high prevalence in the US, we feel it is important to explore the potential for functional foods such as pears to improve cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure in affected middle-aged adults," Johson said, who is now at from the Colorado State University.

The newly appointed National Clinical Director for Cardiovascular Disease Prevention looks at the challenges ahead: There is now growing acceptance across the NHS that we have to get serious about prevention. Much of this, of course, is driven by the epidemic of obesity, poor diet, inactivity and other risk factors that come with the 21st century lifestyle. It is estimated that around two thirds of premature deaths – that is deaths before the age of 75 – could be prevented by tackling the major risk factors. And one in four premature deaths is caused by cardiovascular disease (CVD), especially heart attacks and strokes.

The really surprising thing that was found is that amino acid intake has as much of an effect on blood pressure as established lifestyle risk factors such as salt intake, physical activity and alcohol consumption. For arterial stiffness, the association was similar to the magnitude of change previously associated with not smoking. Beneficial daily amounts equate to a 75g portion of steak, a 100g salmon fillet or a 500ml glass of skimmed milk.

TORONTO, Nov.7, 2015 - A diet developed for reducing cholesterol also lowers blood pressure, a St. Michael's Hospital study has found. The research, published today in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Disease, was a secondary analysis of data collected for a 2011 study on the effect of the 'portfolio diet' on cholesterol. The portfolio diet lowered blood pressure by an average two per cent, when compared with another diet recommended to reduce hypertension. The portfolio diet includes foods that are scientifically-proven to lower cholesterol including mixed nuts, soy protein, plant sterols (found in vegetable oils and leafy vegetables) and viscous fiber (found in oats, barley and eggplant). The comparison method, a dietary approach to stopping hypertension, or DASH diet, emphasizes fruit, vegetables and whole grains, reduced meat and dairy intake, and eliminating snack food.

There is a strong link between diet, exercise, and the development of cardiovascular disease. Nutrition plays an essential role in the treatment of cardiovascular disease, especially in high blood pressure.

Following a whole food diet - such as a Mediterranean diet - may be more effective at reducing cardiovascular risk than a strictly low-fat diet, according to a 2014 research.

Read the full article at: www.medicalnewstoday.com

It is hard to figure out how we follow the American Heart Association's recommendation saying that individuals should limit fat intake to less than 30% of daily calories, while limiting saturated fat to 10% of daily calories...at Dietsensor we want to make this kind of information readable real time on your smartphone, with a minimum level of effort to get it. Because we believe that information is the first step to better decision, for a better life.