Diabetes and Nutrition

Diabetes and Nutrition

Carbohydrates such as bread, pasta, potato, rice and legumes, form the very basis of our diet and are essential energy sources, but are they all created equal? The terms Simple sugars and complex carbohydrates have been used for years to classify carbohydrates according to their molecular structure. It was believed that simple sugars were rapidly … Continue reading Spotlight on the glycemic index: A good guide to good carbs

Astrid Bonnasse, the co-founder of DietSensor, talks about the main features of this application that has revolutionized the management of macronutrients.   Tell us the story behind DietSensor. Was its creation serendipitous? The creation of DietSensor is not at all serendipitous. In 2013, our nine-year-old daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Overnight, we had … Continue reading Interview: Behind the scenes of DietSensor

mySugr   mySugr app is a registered medical app with a pleasant user interface design, which vows to make diabetes suck less. Creating entries has been made easier! In addition, the app presents exciting challenges and amusing feedback (e.g. taming the diabetes monster represents progress), designed to encourage user engagement and help them achieve their … Continue reading TOP INSULIN DOSE CALCULATOR APPS REVIEW

Counting calories is an important part of making smarter nutritional choices. Dieticians, nutritionists, and fitness experts alike now recommend looking beyond the quantity of calories, and measuring the macronutrients of the food you eat in order to achieve weight loss goals. This is now being called macro dieting. Macro dieting aims to feed the body … Continue reading The Importance of Macronutrients in Weight Loss

A low-calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes and save the lives of millions of sufferers of the preventable condition, research suggests. Eating between 825 and 850 calories a day for three to five months put the disease into remission in almost half of patients in a new study, according to the Daily Mail. The Diabetes … Continue reading Low-calorie diet reversed diabetes in half of patients, study finds

portion size control

There are different myths and misunderstood facts that circulate about weight-loss, health, fitness and food choice. Some of these are simply urban legends, while others may have been true at some point.  Today, there is overwhelming scientific evidence that weight-loss has a direct connection to the quality and quantity of the food that we eat.  … Continue reading Does Portion Size Really Matter for Healthy Eating?

childhood-obesity

If in ancient times, being fat was a symbol of wealth and abundance, nowadays, it is a common fact that overweight and obesity may increase the risk of many health problems. Moreover, the subject of childhood obesity is becoming an ever-greater social concern at present. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), childhood obesity is … Continue reading Childhood obesity: an ever-greater social concern

In the modern society, people keeps pushing the emphasis on being thin. In fact, for many people, being thin is vital to be considered beautiful. Obese or overweight people are socially ostracised. For many of them, the only way out of that vicious circle is to lose weight drastically. Dieting can be long and full … Continue reading Crash diets – why starving yourself is bad for weight loss?

Obesity has reached the point of a global epidemic, according to a new report published by the World Health Organization (WHO).  A person is considered obese when their body mass index exceeds 30.  Today, obesity affects more than 2.8 million people each year and this number is increasing constantly.  Excess weight kills approximately 3.4 billion … Continue reading Global Obesity Epidemic – Time to Act Decisively

Combining good nutrition with fitness is necessary to achieve a healthy lifestyle.  Living a healthy lifestyle can mean maintaining a healthy weight, reducing your risk of a chronic disease, becoming more active, and improving your overall health. Whether you are new to fitness, are a fitness enthusiast, or a committed bodybuilder or elite athlete, having … Continue reading Five Tips to Successfully Focus on Both Fitness and Nutrition

As we all may know, money does not buy health.  Diabetes, like other chronic diseases, does not discriminate based on gender, wealth or popularity.  If you have recently been diagnosed with diabetes, wallowing in self-pity will not be of any help.  Instead of being overwhelmed by negative thoughts, try to see things differently and establish … Continue reading Diabetes: Everyone Is At Risk, Even Celebrities

fruit

“An apple a day keeps the doctor away!” So goes one of the most popular English proverbs.  For most, regular fruit consumption will have a positive impact on overall health.  But those with diabetes are often told to avoid certain kinds of fruits, particularly those with a high level of fructose.  Managing blood sugar is … Continue reading Impact of Fruit Consumption on Blood Sugar Level

diabetes

Diabetes is an endocrine disorder that affects 29 million people in the United States.  A recent study in PLoS ONE reported that these individuals are as high as four times more at risk to die as a result of the disorder.  And, eight out of the 29 million cases of diabetes remain undiagnosed (according to the … Continue reading Diabetes Can Kill If Unmanaged

omega-3

A group of researchers from the Guangdong University of Technology led by Professor Allan Zhao have recently discovered that omega-3 fatty acids can reduce the risk of diabetes. The study was featured in The Journal of Clinical Investigation. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects children and young adults. The pancreas stops producing insulin … Continue reading Eating Omega-3 Fatty Acids Can Reduce Diabetes Risk  

It is no easy task to navigate the endless directions and advice from thousands of food experts.  Nor is it easy to stick to an daily nutrition recommendation.  Did I eat the recommended 15% of the daily intake of proteins? What about 50% of carbohydrates? At DietSensor, eating healthy is what we do. The new … Continue reading DietSensor’s New Premium Plan Offers Smart Food Suggestions

Are you looking for a diabetes diet plan to help you manage your sugar level and avoid diabetes complications?  DietSensor is the solution that you have been looking for.  The DietSensor Nutrition Coach can help to keep your blood glucose at the recommended level. How does it work? The DietSensor Nutrition Coach will take you … Continue reading DietSensor Nutrition Coaching – Support For Diabetes

DietSensor is the best nutritional solution to help manage diabetes. The solution comes complete with a mobile app for nutritional planning and tracking, a pocket size scanner, and a smart scale.  With DietSensor, you can measure carbohydrate counts more accurately to better judge how much insulin to use. DietSensor Mobile App:  The mobile app will assist … Continue reading Manage Diabetes with DietSensor

The holidays are a great opportunity to spend time with friends and family.  However, these gatherings are often centered on a meal – which can make things very challenging for individuals with diabetes.  Too much worry about portion selection can induce stress and anxiety.  The American Diabetes Association (ADA) suggests to start meal planning in … Continue reading Keeping Diabetes in Control During the Holidays

healthy eating

Weight loss, diet changes and physical activity all play a role in preventing or delaying diabetes and the many complications that go along with it, including heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness and other health problems.  Read the full article on: www.press-citizen.com More than 86 million of Americans have prediabetes according to a recent study. … Continue reading Diabetes: preventing the disease starts with healthy eating

The number of people with diabetes has quadrupled around the world over the last 35 years, according to a new report. The World Health Organisation (WHO) has warned that diabetes is now a "serious threat to population health" as obesity fuels a rise in the disease. And, while it was once more confined to richer countries, the 2016 WHO report warns that diabetes is now rising fastest in middle and lower-income countries.

Patients who reverse their diabetes and then keep their weight down can remain free of the condition, new research has found.

The number of prescriptions given to treat type 2 diabetes – a disease associated with obesity and lifestyle – has risen by nearly 35 per cent in just four years, according to new research. Data analysts at Exasol produced a heat map of England showing prescription rates in 2011 and 2015, using official Government figures. They found that, based on current trends, the number of people with type 2 diabetes was on track to reach five million by 2020, five years earlier than previously thought.

Omega-3 has been found to help stave off cancer and heart diseaseBut new research suggests eating too many fatty acids can cause diabetesThose who ate a portion a day had a 26% higher rate of type 2 diabetesExperts suggest people consume no more than 4 portions a week

Consuming high-quality plant foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables, nuts and legumes may substantially lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, researchers including one of Indian-origin have claimed. While previous studies have found links between vegetarian diets and improved health outcomes, including reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, this new study is the first to make distinctions between healthy plant-based diets and less healthy ones that include things like sweetened foods and beverages, which may be detrimental for health. Researchers followed more than 200,000 male and female health professionals in the US for more than 20 years who had regularly filled out questionnaires on their diet, lifestyle, medical history, and new disease diagnoses as part of three large long-term studies.

World Health Organisation states 422 million people are affected by diabetes in a report for World Health Day.

Preventative medicine is rapidly becoming the focus of many doctors who would prefer to help their patients prevent rather than treat a disease like diabetes. Ninety percent of diabetes diagnoses are Type 2, which is the most common and preventable version of this disease. Twenty-nine million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year. Dr. Hall believes that this disease can be reversed and many of her patients have not only reported significantly lowered A1c levels (the 3-month average of blood glucose levels), but their physicians have taken them off a majority of their medications, which may include oral medications and regular insulin injections. Proving that prevention works.

Having diabetes puts people at risk for heart and kidney disease, stroke, amputations, and more. Worse yet, 9 out of 10 of those people don't even know they have it.

A new study released in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition has found that apples and pears, as well as blueberries, are fruits particularly associated with a lower risk of Type 2 diabetes. The study looked at the diets of more than 200,000 people, and was originally created to determine whether flavonoid subclasses lead to diabetes. The latter proves that blueberries, apples and pears have a correlation with a lower incidence of diabetes in more than 12,600 cases.

Aggressive treatment can make a big difference in reducing serious complications

Exercise is often recommended to diabetes patients looking to improve their blood sugar, insulin sensitivity, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Some doctors even call it a prescription for diabetes management. Although experts have agreed that physical activity is beneficial for controlling diabetes, research has not been so definitive when it came to preventing the condition. Until now.

Diabetes UK say the number of amputations linked to the disease is risingThe number of amputations in Britain is now 7,370 a year - up from 7,042Chris Askew, of Diabetes UK, said the new figure is a 'huge concern'

In Mayo Clinic Proceedings, experts urge drastic reductions in the consumption of added sugar.

Understand the misconceptions to show your support for those living with this chronic illness. For the more than 29 million Americans who have diabetes, living with the disease is challenge enough. However, awkward, ill-informed or insensitive remarks can add to the difficulties faced. To address misconceptions, it’s important to know what not to say to someone with diabetes. People living with diabetes have to think about what they eat for every meal and snack. However, there is no such thing as the “diabetes diet.” A well-balanced diet is recommended for everyone, not just for people with diabetes.

Researchers tested the effects of weight loss from calorie-cutting, exercise, and a combination of both.

Those who consume alcohol moderately (approximately 1 drink daily or less) are 14-25% more unlikely to develop heart disease

New research suggests gorging on junk food in pregnancy increases the risk a woman's children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren will suffer metabolic problems. The sad part is that the findings show the risks remains even if their offspring consume healthy diets.

Diabetes and kidney disease, separately and together, were linked with increased risks of stroke, coronary heart disease, and cardiovascular mortality in African-Americans living in Mississippi.

Highly structured nutrition therapy helped type 2 diabetes patients reach health goals similar to those accomplished with medications, researchers report. « This is very encouraging since participants un the study have lived with type 2 diabetes for more than 10 years and were not able to control their blood glucose or weight with multiple medications. »

Long term diabetic complications are the result of one or more parts of your body becoming damaged as a result of diabetes. Long term complications need not be inevitable and research indicates that it is possible to minimise complications or avoid or prevent them altogether.

A CDC survey finds that more Americans had health insurance and fewer smoked cigarettes in 2015, but the gains were overshadowed by rising rates of obesity and diabetes.

Physical activity may have less to do with weight loss than we think. We have an obesity problem. But we shouldn’t treat low physical activity and eating too many calories as equally responsible for it. Public-health policies should prioritize fighting over-consumption of ow-quality food and improving the food environment and lifestyle. DietSensor shows you how.

26 May 2016EVMS Medical Group

Diabetes makes a pregnancy high risk. This is because diabetes can cause many potentially negative effects on the baby as well as the mother. Blood sugar is the baby’s food source and it passes from the mother through the placenta to the baby. When a woman has diabetes and her blood sugars are poorly controlled (too high), excess amounts of sugar are transported to the baby. Since the baby does not have diabetes, he/she is able to increase the production of insulin substantially in order to use this extra sugar. DietSensor tells you how to prevent gestational diabetes.

Around the world, the number of people living with diabetes has quadrupled since 1980, and most of the burden of the disease is concentrated in poorer countries. What’s wrong? Why do more and more people become diabetic?

Many times overeating can help bring on type 2 diabetes.It turns out that the opposite - a strict diet - might be the answer to that progressive, debilitating disease. In a study published in the current issue of Diabetes Care, researchers say an extremely low-carrie diet can mitigate and sometimes eliminate the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.

Diabetes occurs when the body doesn’t produce or properly use insulin, a hormone in the body responsible for creating glucose. Glucose, in turn, is the body’s blood sugar, which is needed for immediate energy as well as storage of energy in the muscles and fat cells for later use. While Type 1 diabetes, which is usually diagnosed in childhood, is not yet preventable, Type 2 may be avoided with the right health behaviors. DietSensor shows you how.

A diabetes diet — medically known as medical nutrition therapy (MNT) for diabetes — simply translates into eating a variety of nutritious foods in moderate amounts and sticking to regular mealtimes. At DietSensor, we aims to make life with diabetes easier! And from now on, say goodbye to manual logging.

Diabetes is on the rise, yet most cases are preventable and some can even be reversed. Taking steps to prevent and control diabetes doesn’t mean living in deprivation; it means eating a tasty, balanced diet that will also boost your energy and improve your mood. You don’t have to give up sweets entirely or resign … Continue reading DietSensor : Food Tips to Prevent, Control and Reverse Diabetes

Obesity — everyone knows it’s bad and that it’s everywhere. Nearly 78 million adults and 13 million children in the United States deal with the health and emotional effects of obesity every day. The solution to their problem could sound deceptively simple — take in fewer calories a day, while cranking up the calorie-burning process with regular exercise. But it’s not just a matter of obese people deciding they’re going to eat less, says Donna H. Ryan, M.D., co-chair of the committee that wrote the recent obesity guidelines and professor emerita at Louisiana State University’s Pennington Biomedical Research Center in Baton Rouge.

LONDON (Reuters) - The number of adults with diabetes has quadrupled worldwide in under four decades to 422 million, and the condition is fast becoming a major problem in poorer countries, a World Health Organization study showed on Wednesday. In one of the largest studies to date of diabetes trends, the researchers said ageing populations and rising levels of obesity across the world mean diabetes is becoming “a defining issue for global public health”.

Converts to the bestselling blood sugar diet say you can. When one type 2 diabetic tried it, he reversed his condition. Four years on, is he still cured?

Although type 2 diabetes is preventable, its prevalence and incidence are rapidly increasing in the United States and worldwide. Currently, more than 5.4% of adults worldwide have a diagnosis of diabetes, and an estimated 300 million will have diabetes by 2025. With no cure available for diabetes, primary prevention through diet and exercise is important. DietSensor helps you to maintain this nutritional therapy on daily basis. Let’s discover how.

In this issue of the journal, Livesey and Taylor (1) present a meta-analysis of clinical trials evaluating the effects of fructose intake. They concluded that fructose is safe at doses of <90 g/d and that it may have the added benefit of lowering concentrations of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). This meta-analysis is difficult to interpret, because it involves randomized and nonrandomized studies of differing designs, mixed populations (diabetic and non diabetic lean and obese), different control diets (including some sucrose-based diets that contained fructose), different study durations, and limited endpoints; it also represents an analysis by an industry-sponsored group of a highly selected list of studies

Many experts believe Type 2 diabetes is an incurable disease that gets worse with time. But new research raises the tantalizing possibility that drastic changes in diet may reverse the disease in some people.

Ultra-processed foods comprised 57.9% of energy intake, and contributed 89.7% of the energy intake from added sugars. The content of added sugars in ultra-processed foods (21.1% of calories) was eightfold higher than in processed foods (2.4%) and fivefold higher than in unprocessed or minimally processed foods and processed culinary ingredients grouped together (3.7%). Both in unadjusted and adjusted models, each increase of 5 percentage points in proportional energy intake from ultra-processed foods increased the proportional energy intake from added sugars by 1 percentage point.

In a major symposium at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting 2015, University of Colorado Cancer Center investigator Tim Byers, MD, MPH, describes research showing the link between cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. "Understanding the similarities and differences in how these risk factors create cancer, diabetes and cardiovascular disease could aid the ways we prevent all three diseases," Byers says.

A diagnosis of type 1 diabetes is life-changing for a child--and his or her parents. "That means that affected children and their parents must be vigilant about monitoring their condition--and because there is no cure, this type of maintenance will last a lifetime," says Maureen Villasenor, MD, a board-certified pediatrician at St. Joseph Heritage Medical Group. « Healthy diet and exercise, blood sugar monitoring and insulin treatments are all part of that. »

Diabetes patients can make a drastic impact on the advancement and development of their disease through nutrition and lifestyle modifications for diabetes. In a new study published in US Endocrinology, researchers examined the effectiveness of nutrition and lifestyle modifications in improving diabetes outcomes. One of their essential focuses was on the “ABCs” of diabetes management: A1c, blood pressure and cholesterol. Maintaining an A1c level of about 7%, keeping your blood pressure <140/90mmHg, and maintaining LDL at <100mg/dL (with no cardiovascular disease) and an LDL of <70mg/dL with any type of cardiovascular complications, are key proponents in diabetes management, which is not only the responsibility of the healthcare provider and the medications prescribed to maintain, but the individual themselves. To achieve any of these goals, however, it is important to maintain an active lifestyle and to eat properly throughout the day; this is easier said than done, which is essentially one of the major issues faced by healthcare providers today. Read full article here : diabetesincontrol.com

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Individuals with a BMI of 40.0 to 49.9 have a 250% greater risk of death An analysis of studies has revealed that a body mass index between 20.0 and 24.9 is associated with the lowest risk of mortality from any cause in healthy non smoker adults. The researchers also included accurate estimates of the increased risk of death of overweight and obese individuals in comparison to individuals with a BMI of 20.0 to 24.9. Check infographics here

A sea of research now suggests that fructose, especially high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), is taking a devastating toll on your health. It is a MAJOR factor in the increasing rates of obesity and chronic diseases all over the world. But if fructose is wreaking havoc on everyone's health, then why is it still found in a wide array of food products today? Appalling Facts About Fructose: Fructose is a sweetener usually derived from corn, and is now the single largest calorie source of Americans. Fifty-five percent of sweeteners used by food and beverage manufacturers today are made from HFCS, because it's cheaper and 20 percent sweeter than regular table sugar (sucrose). In fact, the number one source of calories in the United States today is soda, which is sweetened with large HFCS amounts. It is unsurprising that an average American now consumes roughly 47 pounds of cane sugar and 35 pounds of high-fructose corn syrup every year. Just take a look at the wide array of health conditions that fructose is linked to: -Insulin resistance and obesity -Elevated blood pressure -Elevated triglycerides and LDL (bad) cholesterol -Depletion of vitamins and minerals -Cardiovascular disease, liver disease, cancer, arthritis, and gout And here's the sad truth: not everyone is aware that fructose lurks in most processed foods and fast foods, even in those that have been touted "sugar-free" or "low-calorie"!

Mealtime insulin dosing calculation should focus on meal composition—including fat, protein, and glycemic index—rather than carbohydrate counting alone, according to a systematic review published in the June issue of Diabetes Care. Current guidelines only focus on carbohydrates as the basis for calculating insulin doses; however, data indicates that other micronutrients—namely fat and protein—can affect insulin requirements, and the other issues depend on the type of carbohydrates ingested,” explained senior author Howard A. Wolpert, MD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, and Director of the Joslin Institute for Technology Translation, both in Boston, Mass.

There are a whole range of root vegetables and most of them are also starches – a type of carbohydrate. Basically, some plants store glucose as starch – giant chains of sugars. So when it comes to root vegetables and starches, are they safe for type 2 diabetics to eat or not? Even if there isn’t a great deal of evidence to show benefits of root veggies for type 2 diabete, having a wider variety of foods keeps things interesting and it also provides a wider range of vitamins, minerals and nutrients to the body.

All of those factors make getting the right amount of insulin a difficult balancing act. Too much insulin can cause blood sugar levels to dip dangerously low, leading to confusion and mood changes, or even seizures and death, according to JDRF (formerly called the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Too little insulin leaves blood sugar levels too high. Over time -- in addition to making someone feel tired and thirsty -- high blood sugar levels can eventually lead to a higher risk of long-term complications, such as heart disease, vision problems and kidney disease, the ADA says. People with type 1 diabetes have to become nutrition experts and learn how to count the carbohydrates in their food. It's the carbohydrates in foods that get processed into blood sugar in the body. Then they need to learn a mathematical formula to figure out how much insulin they'll need. Insulin pumps may help with the math, but they don't do all the work -- not yet, anyway.

Having diabetes doesn't mean the game is over. Here's how to score a touchdown against the disease.

As a diabetic it's best to stick to low carb options if you want to lower blood sugar. What are the pasta options? Let's take a look and share some recipes too.

Over the past few weeks we’ve looked at several common meal-planning approaches for diabetes management. There are other approaches out there, too, including fat gram counting and the use of sample menus. And chances are, you might use your own approach or a hybrid of approaches. The point is that there is no one right way to plan meals when you have diabetes. In addition, some people follow a vegetarian or vegan plan; others may do best when they limit carbohydrate. I encourage you to think about what makes sense for you, based on your food preferences, lifestyle, and how well you’re meeting your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol goals. If you need help or have questions, seek the advice of a dietitian.

There are only 2 different carb counting methods and they are much simpler to use than you think. Let's go over them together here and clear up any confusion.

If you're type 2 diabetic you need to get your head around the different types of carbohydrates. We explain here what simple and complex carbs are with examples. For best health and blood sugar regulation, choosing complex carbs is the better choice. But, it’s also important to remember that many complex carbs are still high in overall carbohydrates, so some are still best avoided or only eaten in small portions.

How do you lower blood sugar naturally through diet? When you can focus on 2 things, great changes will occur – guaranteed!

If you’re currently using carb counting as a meal-planning method, you’ve probably learned that a little bit of skill is involved. In theory, it seems easy. In reality, it can be tricky. Nevertheless, with practice and perseverance, carb counting is a meal-planning approach that works well. Read the full article at: www.diabetesselfmanagement.com With DietSensor, advanced … Continue reading Diabetes Meal Planning: Advanced Carb Counting – is it for all?